Guidelines for Submission of Photography

 

We accept original photography only. Photographers must submit their own work.

 

Special attention is given to photographs that focuses on holistic Christian spirituality. 

 

No portraits please.

 

Submissions are open year-round, always welcomed, and always free. 

 

Photographers are allowed to submit two photos for each six-month cycle of the journal (winter and summer).

 

Please note that the editor will not accept work that has been previously published, in print or online. The editor does NOT consider self-publishing to blogs, message boards, or social media as publication with respect to this rule.

 

Simultaneous submissions to other publications are not allowed.

 

 

The Publishing Process

 

The editor will only respond to photos that will be published in the journal. We will let photographers know the edition of the journal in which their photo will appear. Photographers will be given a complimentary copy of the journal in which their photo appears.

 

Photographers are required to release copyright permission to the journal.

 

As mentioned above, we publish the journal on a six-month cycle, therefore it may take a few weeks or months before a photo is selected for the journal. Once the photo is selected for publication, the photographer will be contacted as to publication and use of their photo.

 

All photos must be submitted in black and white in digital format with a minimal 3300 DPI.

 

Publisher may change the guidelines for publication periodically. Please check back for updates.

 

Sissi Hopper, photography editor

G. Steve Kinnard, editor

 

 

 

Guidelines for Submission of Poetry

 

We accept original poetry only. Authors must submit their own work.

 

Special attention is given to poetry that focuses on holistic Christian spirituality. 

 

Submissions are open year-round, always welcomed, and always free. 

 

Authors are allowed to submit up to five poems for each six-month cycle of the journal (winter and summer). Poems may be of any length, style, and font.

 

Please note that we do not accept work that has been previously published, in print or online. We do NOT consider self-publishing to blogs, message boards, or social media as publication with respect to this rule.

 

Simultaneous submissions to other publications are not allowed.

 

Please submit poems in Microsoft Word format. If you submit multiple poems, please submit in a single file.

 

 

The Publishing Process

 

We will only respond to poems that will be used in the journal. We will let authors know the edition of the journal in which their poem will appear. Authors will be given a complimentary copy of the journal in which their poem appears.

 

Authors are required to release copyright permission to the journal.

 

As mentioned above, we publish the journal on a six-month cycle, therefore it may take a few weeks or months before a poem is selected for the journal. Once the poem is selected for publication, the author will be contacted as to publication and use of their poem.

 

The publisher may change the guidelines for publication periodically. Please check back for updates.

 

Nathan Shank, poetry editor

G. Steve Kinnard, editor

 

 

Guidelines for Submission of Short Fiction

 

We accept original stories only. Authors must submit their own work.

 

Special attention is given to short fiction that focuses on holistic Christian spirituality. 

 

Submissions are open year-round, always welcomed, and always free. 

 

Authors are allowed to submit up to one piece of short fiction for each six-month cycle of the journal (winter and summer). Short fiction must not exceed 1,000 words. Short fiction includes parable, fables, short stories, and other narrative tales.

 

Please note that we do not accept work that has been previously published, in print or online. We do NOT consider self-publishing to blogs, message boards, or social media as publication with respect to this rule.

 

Simultaneous submissions to other publications are not allowed.

 

Please submit poems in Microsoft Word format. If you submit multiple poems, please submit in a single file.

 

 

The Publishing Process

 

We will only respond to short fiction that will be used in the journal. We will let authors know the edition of the journal in which their work will appear. Authors will be given a complimentary copy of the journal in which their work appears.

 

Authors are required to release copyright permission to the journal.

 

As mentioned above, we publish the journal on a six-month cycle, therefore it may take a few weeks or months before a work is selected for the journal. Once the work is selected for publication, the author will be contacted as to publication and use of their work.

 

The publisher may change the guidelines for publication periodically. Please check back for updates.

 

Nathan Shank, short fiction editor

G. Steve Kinnard, editor

Information for Authors

 

Τελειος Journal

 

Teleios is the journal of the Teleios Society. The Teleios Society exists to promote holistic spirituality in the lives of disciples of Jesus.

 

Teleios is a Greek word meaning, mature, whole, complete, or perfect. The Apostle Paul used this word to state his purpose for writing to the churches in Colossae, Laodicea, and Heirapolis, “It is he (Christ) whom we proclaim, warning everyone and teaching everyone in all wisdom, so that we may present everyone mature (teleios) in Christ” (Colossians 1:28). This verse serves as the mission statement of the Teleios Society and the Teleios Journal.

 

On these pages you will find instructions for submitting and formatting an article, a style sheet for articles, and special guidelines for book reviews.

 

All academic articles submitted to Teleios are subjected to a blind, peer-review process. Therefore, please omit any information that would identify you as author.

 

The articles of university scholars will be not be subject to peer review. Thank you for honoring Teleios with the publication of your article.

If you have any questions, please contact Steve Kinnard at skinnard@teleiosjournal.com or Mary Beth Bowen at mbowen@teleiosjournal.com.

 

Style Sheet for Essays

 

 

Format

 

  • Use one-inch margins on all four sides of the page.

 

  • Use a 12-point font (Times New Roman is preferred), with 24-point (double line) spacing for all text, including footnotes.

 

  • Number the pages, but do not include any other information in headers or footers.

 

  • Do not include a bibliography. For instructions about citation, see point 6 on footnotes below.

 

 

Spelling and Editing

 

  • Unless this style sheet has different instructions, follow The Chicago Manual of Style on general editing questions.

 

  • Use United States or American spellings.

 

  • Use the final “series comma” in lists of three or more items.

 

  • Use italics for emphasis, book and journal titles, and foreign words. Do not use underlining or bolding at all.

 

  • Do not use page, section, or footnote numbers that refer, within your article, to the article itself.

 

  • When there is any question as to capitalization, do not capitalize words.

 

  • As stated in the Chicago Manual, omit hyphens wherever possible.

 

  • Greek and Hebrew words, which should be used sparingly, must be transliterated and italicized.

 

  • Use only one space to separate sentences and after colons.

 

 

Biblical Citations

 

References to the Bible may be included within the text of the article, in parentheses, before the final punctuation of the sentence. Use the abbreviations of biblical books in the Chicago Manual. Separate chapter from verse with a colon. The version you are quoting should be mentioned in the first citation only.

 

 

Abbreviations

 

Teleios does not use any Latin abbreviations. Use English phrases instead of i.e., etc., and e.g. Instructions for avoiding cf., ibid., and op. cit. in footnotes are in point 6 below.

 

 

General Matters of Style

 

  • Teleios is read not only by scholars, but also by an educated but general audience. When technical or specialized terminology is necessary, explain it.

 

  • Wherever possible, use gender-inclusive language.

 

  • Write in the active, not the passive voice. Avoid the “editorial we.” First-person singular pronouns are quite acceptable.

 

  • In longer articles, include headings and, if necessary, subheadings. In general, these should not be numbered.

 

 

Endnotes

Teleios uses endnotes at the end of each article.

 

a. General rule for endnotes

 

The general rule is simple. Your first citation of a published work should give all the relevant information. Every reference thereafter should use only the original author’s last name and a short title for the book or article, followed by a page number.

 

This general rule has two negative corollaries, both noted above. Teleios does not use ibid. or loc. cit. or op. cit., and we do not use bibliographies or lists of works consulted.

Bibliographical information for any work consulted will appear in the first endnote that refers to that work.

 

b. First endnote — books

 

In the first endnote for a book, give the author’s name, the title, and (in parentheses) the place of publication, publisher, and date; the page number follows, as in this example.1

 

1 Cristina Mazzoni, The Women in God’s Kitchen: Cooking, Eating, and Spiritual Writing (New York: Continuum, 2005), 33-37.

 

c. First endnote — articles

 

For an article, the order is: author’s name, title of the article, name of the journal, volume number, year (in parentheses), and after a colon and a space, the page number. It is helpful, though not absolutely necessary, to provide the range of pages for the whole article, as well as the page or pages you are referring to, as in the example.2

 

2 Belden C. Lane, “Merton’s Hermitage: Bachelard, Domestic Space, and Spiritual Transformation,” (123-50) Spiritus 4 (2004): 128.

 

d. First endnote — chapters in an edited book

 

The form for a chapter in an edited book combines (b) and (c), like this.3

 

3 Constance FitzGerald, “Impasse and the Dark Night,” in Joann Wolski Conn, ed., Women’s Spirituality: Resources for Christian Development, 2nd ed. (New York: Paulist Press, 1996), 410-450.

 

e. Subsequent endnotes

 

Once complete information has been given, use a short title (which you should determine) in each subsequent endnote, whether of a book4 or an article or chapter.5

 

4 The Women in God’s Kitchen, 131.

5 FitzGerald, “Impasse and Dark Night,” 415.

 

f. Some additional instructions

 

  • References to classical works that have been published in many editions and translations should be numbered according to the original scheme.6 It is for the author to decide whether to include, as well, information about the modern edition consulted. If you do include this, it should follow the usual format for books as outlined above.

 

 

6 Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae III q. 2 a. 1 reply; see also Augustine, De Trinitate VIII 4 (6).

 

  • The ban on Latin abbreviations includes cf. Write “see” or “see also” or “compare” or “consult,” depending on what you mean.

 

  • Longer, explanatory endnotes that include bibliographical information should include it in the format prescribed here.1 For example, the endnote may itself include a quotation.

 

One last note. The following is a quote from our contract with Herder & Herder. In the following “the WORK” refers to your article or book review.” The context of this statement concerns quoting from other publications. The contract reads as follows:

 

(f) In all cases where a passage in the WORK is not original (composed by EDITOR) and longer than 8 words, the EDITOR shall set the passage in opening and closing quotation marks, and provide the source for the passage. This requirement applies to all sources -- including but not limited to printed books and journals, speeches, colloquia and panel discus- sions, television and cable programming, webcasts, YouTube, online reference materials and encyclopedias, online magazines and newspapers, and online opinion sites and blogs -- and regardless of whether EDITOR believes the material to be in the public domain;

 

(g) In any passage in the WORK where more than 3 words consecutively are quoted from a song lyric, music video, or poem, whether or not the source is believed to be in the public domain, the quotation is indicated by opening and closing quotation marks and the source of the quotation is given, including the full title of the work and the name of the EDITOR or lyricist (indication of the recording artist does not suffice).

 

 

Thank you for your contribution to Teleios.

 

G. Steve Kinnard

General Editor

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Contact

General Inquiries :

Please email us at: info@teleiosjournal.com

Submissions:

Please email us at: submissions@teleiosjournal.com

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